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Posts Tagged ‘Lafayette Street’

One of the exhibits created by students in the Creating Digital History course:

Documenting Death: The Records of the New York Marble Cemetery

by Christina Bell

In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.

  • -Benjamin Franklin, in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, 1789.

The one thing common to both death and taxes is paperwork. Each enterprise generates a vast amount of documentation, and such records serve to inform much about individuals and society in past years.

This project relates physical space to an archive. Located on Second Avenue just north of Second Street in New York’s East Village, the New York Marble Cemetery has been an active burial site since 1830. The dead were interred in large, underground marble vaults, with no headstone but a vault number. Here lies the importance of the archive: the records of the New York Marble Cemetery, housed by the New-York Historical Society, are the only way to identify and track those buried here.

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One of the exhibits created by students in the Creating Digital History course:

A Peculiar and Private Press: Targ Editions on West 12th Street

by Jackie Rider

On retirement, publisher William Targ spent a decade creating limited editions of works by famous writers and artists such as John Updike, Kate Millett, Edward Gorey and others.  This exhibit showcases some of those books and looks at the man behind them, what he sought by making them, and his place in Greenwich Village culture of the 1970s.  It also asks, do digital images successfully represent fine press books?

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One of the exhibits created by students in the Creating Digital History course:

NYC Punk: The History of Punk Rock in the Village

by Lynda Van Wart

This exhibit, NYC Punk: The History of Punk Rock in the Village, traces the history of the punk rock scene from its origins to its punk-punk influences.  It concentrates on New York bands as well as venues and other related spaces within the “Village” (including East, West and Greenwich).  NYC Punk begins its history with the early 1970s and utilizes photographs, flyers, sound samples and video clips.

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One of the exhibits created by students in the Creating Digital History course:

The Peace Pentagon: 339 Lafayette Street, A History of Peace Movements in the East Village

by Nicole Greenhouse

The War Resisters Building, the Peace Building, the Muste Building, the Peace Pentagon: 339 Lafayette Street has gone by many names over the years. This exhibit takes a look at the many different tenant’s that occupied the building from its inception as a haven for peace movements and organizations in New York City and Greenwich Village. These organizations used visual culture to promote its causes, whether it was through signs, video, or a placard on a building.

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